Meat Healthier Than Lettuce ?

One of the most boring pieces of produce that (little do most know) has little to no nutritional value whatsoever that often times (over kale or spinach) and has stood at the forefront fork front of the “nutritional” meal has gotten exposed for the fraud it is: Lettuce.

With the exception of darker lettuce (i.e. romaine) many of us pull up to the popular delicacy, twirling our forks and tightening our lips from the tang of the salad dressing-feeling thin (our on our way to it) while chomping lettuce like it’s the truth, the light, and bacon lettucethe way but the fact is, lettuce (especially iceberg lettuce) has never held much nutritional value but always looked good at the foundation of a salad.

Many foodies and wanna-some-day-be-able-to-eat like Jesus’er (like me) that not only hate dining out and getting a salad with a plate full of lettuce vines (and constantly fantasized about requesting that your salad come out with vineless lettuce but dare not ask-feeling the tediousness would also come with a sure side of sputum in it) got tired of fighting with those thoughts and either did it at home ourselves or, over lettuce at all, opted for spinach as the salad’s foundation.

Well leave it to the meat police to expose lettuce and vegetarian diets and being culinary culprits that are ruining the environment-a stark raving contradiction to a study published last month in the Environment Systems and Decisions scholarly journal that once held meat farming in low regard for being worse for the environment than growing fruits and vegetables.

A new research team of Carnegie Mellon University begs to differ, claiming vegetarian diets have a profoundly negative environmental effect on climate change that meat does, stating “following the USDA recommendations to consume more fruits, vegetables, dairy and seafood is more harmful to the environment because those foods have relatively high resource uses and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per calorie.”

In a press release press release Professor of social and decision sciences, engineering, and public policy Paul Fischbeck elaborated “Eating lettuce is over three times