ANGELINA JOLIE Pens Open Letter to NEW YORK TIMES For At-Risk Women Regarding Preventive Care & Her Personal Decision to Remove Ovaries & Fallopian Tubes

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Beyond the beauty, the glam, and the sex appeal that she’s been known long for, equally-Angelina Jolie Pitt is known for caring about the world outside of her world of glam and all things “self” while managing being the wife of Hollywood actor Brad Pitt and mother to Shiloh Nouvel Jolie-Pitt, Vivienne Marcheline Jolie-Pitt, Maddox Chivan Jolie-Pitt, Zahara Marley Jolie-Pitt, Paz Thien Jolie-Pitt, and Knox Leon Jolie-Pitt.

alg-resize-brad-pitt-angelina-jolie-jpg425.joliepitt.cm_.32011As well and all duties considered, it’s all wonder that the life by which she is revered, known, and earns a living still goes on with the same zeal as other issues and causes in the world [that too], she cares about without reward or award and with all humility, bravery and openness.

Two years ago, Jolie took the brave step of publicizing something antithetical of the norm for the life by which she’s known and lives and instead, chose life: Angie made the brave decision to have a preventive double mastectomy and shared it with the world to create awareness about breast cancer and share knowledge with other at-risk women of the world in an effort to inform them what options were out there for preventive care.

Jolie made good on her promise two years ago: to follow up with what, if any more useful information she could be a living example for to provide and well, that time is now-as, she has been preparing herself to undergo further preventive care by making the decision to remove her ovaries and fallopian tubes.

Angie penned an open letter to the New York Times for other at-risk women regarding preventive care and by using herself as a living example, shared these words and this message:

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TWO years ago I wrote about my choice to have a preventive double mastectomy. A simple blood test had revealed that I carried a mutation in the BRCA1 gene. It gave me an estimated 87 percent risk of breast cancer and a 50 percent risk of ovarian cancer. I lost my mother, grandmother and aunt to cancer.

I wanted other women at risk to know about the options. I promised to follow up with any information that could be useful, including about my next preventive surgery, the removal of my ovaries and fallopian tubes.
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I had been planning this for some time. It is a less complex surgery than the mastectomy, but its effects are more severe. It puts a woman into forced menopause. So I was readying myself physically and emotionally, discussing options with doctors, researching alternative medicine, and mapping my hormones for estrogen or progesterone replacement. But I felt I still had months to make the date.

Then two weeks ago I got a call from my doctor with blood-test results. “Your CA-125 is normal,” he said. I breathed a sigh of relief. That test measures the amount of the protein CA-125 in the blood, and is used to monitor ovarian cancer. I have it every year because of my family history.

But that wasn’t all. He went on. “There are a number of inflammatory markers that are elevated, and taken together they could be a sign of early cancer.” I took a pause. “CA-125 has a 50 to 75 percent chance of missing ovarian cancer at early stages,” he said. He wanted me to see the surgeon immediately to check my ovaries.

I went through what I imagine thousands of other women have felt. I told myself to stay calm, to be strong, and that I had no reason to think I wouldn’t live to see my children grow up and to meet my grandchildren.

I called my husband in France, who was on a plane within hours. The beautiful thing about such moments in life is that there is so much clarity. You know what you live for and what matters. It is polarizing, and it is peaceful.images (4)

That same day I went to see the surgeon, who had treated my mother. I last saw her the day my mother passed away, and she teared up when she saw me: “You look just like her.” I broke down. But we smiled at each other and agreed we were there to deal with any problem, so “let’s get on with it.”

Nothing in the examination or ultrasound was concerning. I was relieved that if it was cancer, it was most likely in the early stages. If it was somewhere else in my body, I would know in five days. I passed those five days in a haze, attending my children’s soccer game, and working to stay calm and focused.

The day of the results came. The PET/CT scan looked clear, and the tumor test was negative. I was full of happiness, although the radioactive tracer meant I couldn’t hug my children. There was still a chance of early stage cancer, but that was minor compared with a full-blown tumor. To my relief, I still had the option of removing my ovaries and fallopian tubes and I chose to do it.

I did not do this solely because I carry the BRCA1 gene mutation, and I want other women to hear this. A positive BRCA test does not mean a leap to surgery. I have spoken to many doctors, surgeons and naturopaths. There are other options. Some women take birth control pills or rely on alternative medicines combined with frequent checks. There is more than one way to deal with any health issue. The most important thing is to learn about the options and choose what is right for you personally.

images (3)In my case, the Eastern and Western doctors I met agreed that surgery to remove my tubes and ovaries was the best option, because on top of the BRCA gene, three women in my family have died from cancer. My doctors indicated I should have preventive surgery about a decade before the earliest onset of cancer in my female relatives. My mother’s ovarian cancer was diagnosed when she was 49. I’m 39.

I have a little clear patch that contains bio-identical estrogen. A progesterone IUD was inserted in my uterus. It will help me maintain a hormonal balance, but more important it will help prevent uterine cancer. I chose to keep my uterus because cancer in that location is not part of my family history.angelina-jolie_young

It is not possible to remove all risk, and the fact is I remain prone to cancer. I will look for natural ways to strengthen my immune system. I feel feminine, and grounded in the choices I am making for myself and my family. I know my children will never have to say, “Mom died of ovarian cancer.”